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Tag: cycle touring

Ruta de las Andinas Part I

12/11/19 – 12/17/19 From the old mission church near the end of the Ruta de las Vicuñas the road drops over a thousand meters to the town of Colchane.  Much of it runs through a narrow canyon filled with alpaca munching on wet grasses and vizcachas, a desert rodent the size of a rabbit, chasing Read More

Bruce Springsteen and Ruta de las Vicuñas

12/7/19 – 12/10/19 “We could have been over this hill if you hadn’t been clipping your toenails this morning.” “Maybe we should shut up and listen to the harmonica” “Maybe you should ask Bruce Springsteen to ride my bike” “Bruce drives a beat up Chevy, but he would offer you a lift and a beer Read More

Arica to Putre

11/29/19 – 12/6/19 Before going to bed we’d put the leftover chicken and salad we’d bought the previous night in the fridge so we could have it for lunch on our way to Arica.  I got up around six and found David asleep on the kitchen floor, a mangled bird carcass next to him.  Salad Read More

Arequipa to Tacna part deux

11/22/19 – 11/28/19 Altitude can have strange effects on the human body.  Thickened blood and pressure on the brain can cause a number of unexpected issues.  In many cases, a person’s fitness is irrelevant.  It was cold and dark by six and we went to bed early.  I awoke around nine thirty and noticed that Read More

Arequipa to Tacna Part I

11/19/19 – 11/22/19 Arequipa outskirts.  Bus exhaust breakfast.  Hectic hustling through traffic, but soon discover ourselves removed from urban confines and in mountain bordering pueblos.  In the air a mixture of mesquite, parched desert, and grilled chicken.  Lunch in Pocsi.  Asked if the water was potable and a woman confirmed in a curious manner as Read More

Arequipa and Volcan Chachani

11/12/19 – 11/18/19 At sea level, atmospheric pressure is around 14.7 pounds per square inch.  At sixty thousand feet above sea level (~18,000 meters) it drops to one pound per square inch.  This elevation is known as the Armstrong limit in Honor of General Harry George Armstrong, who was the first to recognize the significance Read More

Cajamarca

11/3/19 – 11/11/19 “I have never used them, but to me they seem like they would be very nice.” Wim, our host, had a soft and polite voice.  He’d directed us to a dentist around the corner.  All we needed was a cleaning. We walked in together and promptly directed to a pair of 1950’s Read More

The Pope’s toilet

10/26/19 – 11/2/19 In my attempts to learn Spanish, I came across a film called “The Pope’s toilet.” It is about a town in Uruguay that will be visited by the Pope.  The newspapers predict over a million people will come to see him speak and so everyone in town is scheming how to profit Read More

Four seasons of feet – Footwear for a two year cycle tour

Cycle tourists are forever searching for that perfect balance of utility, comfort, and weight.  One of the most important gear decisions we make is how to cover our feet.  Between Alaska and Argentina we will cross tundra, swamp, tropical forests, high deserts, low deserts, beaches, snowcapped peaks, and frozen rivers.  Temperatures will range from several Read More

Lamas to Chachapoyas

10/18/19 – 10/25/19 I was up at five in the morning due to an over achieving rooster.  I decided to work on my Spanish a bit and opened up my frequency dictionary, which lists the words of a language in order of the ones most commonly used.  I took note that “Dios,” or “God,” is Read More

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